School Innovation & Improvement Plan

Outcome goals for this academic school year

STATEMENTS

FAIRFAX COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS—BELIEFS

Each student is entitled to an excellent education that meets his or her individual needs. Effective educators are essential to student success.

We thrive in a vibrant, healthful, safe, enriching, and respectful environment.

A well-rounded education enables students to lead productive, fulfilling, creative and culturally rich lives.

A successful education system fosters effective communication, critical thinking, creativity and collaboration.

A dynamic partnership among students, parents, educators and with the community is critical to meet student needs and provide enriching experiences. Families play a fundamental role in their children’s education.

Our diversity is a strength that creates resilient, open and innovative global citizens. High expectations inspire high performance.

An educated citizenry sustains our economy and our system of self-governance. Self-motivation and personal responsibility are keys to future success.

Early childhood education is crucial to school readiness and future success.

Reading proficiency by third grade is critical for the academic success of all students.

 

FAIRFAX COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS—MISSION STATEMENT

Fairfax County Public Schools inspires and empowers students to meet high academic standards, lead ethical lives, and be responsible and innovative global citizens.

 

FAIRFAX COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS—VISION STATEMENT

Looking to the Future

FCPS prepares all students for the world of the future by giving them a broad spectrum of opportunities to prepare for education and employment beyond high school. All graduates are productive and responsible members of society, capable of competing in the global economy and motivated to pursue learning throughout their lifetimes.

Commitment to Opportunity

FCPS values its diversity, and acknowledges that all people contribute to the well-being of the community. FCPS provides opportunities for all its students and employees to grow educationally, personally, and professionally.

Community Support

Fairfax County embraces its schools. Businesses and community members generously volunteer their time and resources to help students. Schools are integrated into the fabric of the community, and residents take pride in their schools. The success of FCPS draws businesses to Fairfax County. Citizens support the financial and capital needs of the school system.

Achievement

Fairfax County students achieve at high levels in all core areas and across a broad spectrum of pursuits. FCPS values a well-rounded education that goes beyond basics, and encompasses the arts, technology, communication, and critical thinking skills in preparation for the work of the world. FCPS provides a breadth and depth of opportunities to allow all students to stretch their capabilities and pursue their passions.

Accountability

FCPS is accountable for the academic achievement of all students. FCPS measures academic progress, to ensure that all students, regardless of race, poverty, language or disability, will graduate with the knowledge and skills necessary for college and/or employment. FCPS spends money wisely. FCPS directs funds to the classroom, and finds ways to improve performance across the spectrum of academic programs and business processes.

SCHOOL—MISSION STATEMENT

Hutchison’s mission is to continuously foster, enrich, and celebrate academic, social, and emotional success.

SCHOOL--VISION STATEMENT

The vision of Hutchison Elementary School is to empower all students to create and achieve their hopes and dreams to become successful members of the global community.

For information on special programs at Hutchison Elementary School

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

 

Name

Position

Ray Lonnett

Principal

Katie Aldridge

Assistant Principal

Jean Peretzman

Instructional Coach

Eric Blomquist

Instructional Coach

Reema Butler

Kindergarten Teacher

Ashley Waldrom

Kindergarten Teacher

Mary Markfelder

1st grade Teacher

Diana Norseen

1st grade Teacher

Elsa Stang

2nd grade Teacher

Floriana VanPelt

2nd grade Teacher

Tammy Unsoy

3rd grade Teacher

Jason Shirley

3rd grade Teacher

Laura Yuska

4th grade Teacher

Amanda Holley

4th grade Teacher

Katy Curran

5th grade Teacher

Carly Le Blanc

5th grade Teacher

Brittany Good

6th grade Teacher

TIMELINE OF SIP COMMITTEE MEETINGS

Date of Meeting

Committee/Subcommittee

Administrator Scheduled to Attend

September 12

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

October 17

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

November 14

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

December 12

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

January 30

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

February 27

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

March 20

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

April 24

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

May 22

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

June 5

All Committee Members

Ray Lonnett

Data Reviewed:

Hutchison Elementary is located in Herndon, VA and serves approximately 1,000 students in grades Pre-K thru 6. Hutchison is a community of learners dedicated to the belief that all students will be lifelong learners and productive citizens.

Demographics: Hutchison Elementary student population is comprised of 72% Hispanic, 8% Black, 6% White and 12% Asian students. The majority of students who attend Hutchison (82%) are Economically Disadvantaged. Additionally, 64% (over 640 students) are English Language Learners (LEP). Hutchison has an 18% Mobility Rate and the enrollment continues to increase approximately 20 students per year. An additional challenge is that more students are living within the same homes increasing the students who qualify under the definition of homeless (doubled up in homes with no long term housing plans). The students who qualify for Free Reduced Lunch has increased by approximately 4% in the past two years which is 76 additional students in need of financial assistance. Many students who attend Hutchison are new to the country and have had limited access to consistent and formal schooling. The past two years, more students were assessed with the WIDA than any other FCPS elementary school noting that the adjustments for English Learners is a strong consideration for Hutchison (over 640 students). Additionally the size of Hutchison is considerable since even a small percent increase in student achievement is a larger sample size than smaller schools.

SOL Pass Rates:

Hutchison ES is a fully accredited school with the Virginia Department of Education. In a three-year review of the data, adjusted pass rates outperformed the benchmark across all subject areas without the reliance of multiple test year (three year) averages. Mathematics being the highest performing content area at 85% (SOL pass rate) and 91% (SOA Combined rate), a 78% (SOL pass rate) and 91% (SOA Combined rate) in English, an 86% pass rate in History and a 78% pass rate in Science. While these pass rates have met/exceeded the target for accreditation in each content area, the need for all students to achieve at high levels (despite the many obstacles they face) still exists.

Consequently, the unadjusted pass rates overall and for each subgroup across content areas will be important in our continued efforts for enhanced school improvement.

 

Reading Rates are As Follows (unadjusted, adjusted combined rate): (All students) 51%, 91%

(White) 79%, 91%

(Black) 55%, 78% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 4% and achieve 64%)

(Hispanic) 44%, 91% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 55%)

(FRM) 46%, 91% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 57%)

(LEP) 47%, 94% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 55%)

(SWD) 22%, 77% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 48%)

 

Math Rates are As Follows (unadjusted, adjusted combined rate):

(All students) 59%, 91%

(White) 83%, 88%

(Black) 63%, 81% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 4% and achieve 73%)

(Hispanic) 53%, 91% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 59%)

(FRM) 56%, 94% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 62%)

(LEP) 56%, 94% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 59%)

(SWD) 36%, 78% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 51%)

 

Chronic Absenteeism:

Hutchison has an attendance committee comprised of the school Principal, Social Worker, Counselors, Parent Liaison, Office Assistant and Attendance Officer who meet bi-weekly to monitor attendance and to provide intervention as necessary. While chronic absenteeism is not a concern at this time, there is consideration for the Hutchison community where most families (over 70%) are from countries outside of the US. Additionally, over 80% are economically disadvantaged. Consequently, not only is travel during the traditional summer months more expensive (and less accessible for families at Hutchison), there are also cultural customs of being there for family in time of need, honoring the deceased at the time of loss and often on the anniversary of death. While Hutchison works with families to inform them of the impact that absenteeism has on educational progress, the families of Hutchison need to be able to have family relationships and honor customs of their culture. With this understanding, the greatest absentee infractions at Hutchison are extended absences for pre-arranged out of country travel. The second largest impact on attendance is in the primary grades for a cause of short term illness.

Attendance Statistics

•            2015-16: 78 of 943 with > 10% (8.70%)

•            2016-17: 69 of 982 with > 10% (7.64%)

•            2017-18: 52 of 1051 with > 10% (5.8%)

 

  Strengths   Areas for Growth

1

Adjusted pass rates have shown consistent gains across subject areas and have met accountability benchmarks the past three years. NOTE: With the help of Hutchison's Title I funded Instructional Coach, the professional development supports (staffing funded through Title I to support growth in instructional practices for all students to access), combined with the Title I funded After School Intervention Program, the computer adaptive online resources to support learning across content areas, and the strategies for continued family engagement (funded by Title I), Hutchison will make continued student achievement gains and school improvement.

1

The unadjusted pass rates are of concern across subject areas and for each subgroup.

2

Mathematics, both adjusted and unadjusted) are outperming the other content areas. NOTE: With the help of Hutchison's Title I funded Instructional Coach, the professional development supports supports (staffing funded through Title I to support growth in instructional practices for all students to access), combined with the Title I funded After School Intervention Program, the computer adaptive online resources to support learning across content areas, and the strategies for continued family engagement (funded by Title I), Hutchison will make continued student achievement gains and school improvement.

2

Hutchison has struggled to meet English benchmarks historically, and has only met the benchmark with the past few years within a small percentage. Further, the unadjusted pass rates are a concern across all subgroups, noting the greatest area of challenge being English Learners who no longer will access the VGLA.

3

Hutchison has 1:1 computers for students in grades 3-6.

3

While the computer device can be an additional platform for learning, Title I funds make it possible for Hutchison students to access robust online resources with computer adaptive software that are a match to English Language Learners (Imagine Learning) and that tailor learning experiences to student developmental levels. With the support of Title I, it is possible to have enriched resources to support learning in both English (Image Learning) and in Mathematics (Reflex and Dreambox).

 Evidence to Support

SOL Pass Rates Adjusted:

 

Reading 77%

Math 83%

Reading Unadjusted Rates are As Follows: (All students) 56%

 

(White) 76%

 

(Black) 60% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 4% and achieve 64%)

 

(Hispanic) 49% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 55%)

 

(FRM) 52% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 57%)

 

(LEP) 49% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 55%)

 

(SWD) 42% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 48%)

 

Math Unadjusted Rates are As Follows:

 

(All students) 61%

 

(White) 76%

 

(Black) 69% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 4% and achieve 73%)

 

(Hispanic) 54% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 59%)

 

(FRM) 57% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 62%)

  (LEP) 54% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 5% and achieve 59%)
  (SWD) 45% (Needing to achieve 75% or reduce failure rate by 6% and achieve 51%)

 

Root Causes

Most students who attend Hutchison enter without school readiness. Even though the pass rates have met accreditation measures (adjusted scores), historically only 36% of students have met End of Year Benchmarks in Reading at the End of 1st and 2nd Grades.

 

Additionally, students who attend Hutchison often come in not having had access to previous grade level experiences, have had interruption to schooling or limited access at all.

With a strong focus on early intervention through high quality data driven best instructional practices, combined with Tier 2 and 3 targeted support, job embedded coaching, and access to high quality resources, our students will make greater gains. Historically, Hutchison had intervention support, but little resources were placed on the development of Tier 1 best practices in instruction and in high quality professional learning efforts.

 

With a focus on differentiated practices, data analysis, and quality resources, combined with additional intervention before and after school, Hutchison can provide the best support possible despite the significant need. Each of these actions are supported by Title I funding.

Component 3:

Instructional strategies that strengthen the academic program in the school; increase the amount and quality of learning time; and help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum, which may include programs, activities, and courses necessary to provide a well-rounded education.

  Strengths   Areas for Growth

 

1

Title I funding has made it possible for Literacy Collaborative professional learning (class combined with job embedded coaching) for teachers in the primary grades.

1

The program has only been in place for one school year. Continued time is needed for development.

2

An intermediate level (grade 4-6) Literacy Collaborative Coach has been identified and is staffed through the proposed Title I Budget.

2

There was no candidate in the last school year, so grades 4-6 students did not access consistent instructional coherence as a total program, nor did teachers in grades 4-6 have regular and ongoing professional learning support specific to the area of literacy instruction.

3

There was a new Title 1 funded Instructional Coach to support team collaboration and data dialogue for grade level teams.

3

This resource was new. Additional emphasis is needed to focus data reflection with a specific lens on subgroups.

 

Evidence to Support

Feedback from teachers, Instructional practice growth, support in collaborative team meetings focused on data.

There was only one year of implementation of LC and the coach was new. Hiring holds in FCPS in 2016 prevented being able to hire for the Intermediate LC position last school year.

 

Root Causes

Title 1 funds did provide support.

Additional emphasis on subgroup data and on unadjusted pass rates will help to refine the instructional program and provide enhanced focus.

 

Component 4:

Address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs those at risk of not meeting the challenging state academic standards (see notes on right)

  Strengths   Areas for Growth

1

Hutchison implemented a new Responsive Instruction Model that monitored student achievement and facilitated conversation and instructional response plans for students.

1

The new RI process was new and takes time to refine.

 

Additionally, the number of students needing intervention is significant. Plans are outlined in the proposed budget to provide additional targeted intervention (both during and after school).

2

Hutchison has 1:1 computers for students in grades 3-6. Additionally, Title I support has allowed for stronger programs for the students to access and to support their learning.

2

The programs offer additional reports and resources to teachers. Additional time is needed to learn how to best use and to maximize the resources.

3

Hutchison has an attendance committee to monitor attendance.

3

Continue to work with the community to inform them of the impact attendance has on student achievement. The parent liaison additional funded hours (Family Engagement) support growth in this area.

 

Evidence to Support

Significant number of students discussed in interventions each day has resulted in more interventions and in providing services for students.

 

 

Root Causes

The former RI model did not provide the full support of all teammates at the table. Additionally, the former process was more time intensive and lacked communication which left teachers frustrated with the level of limited support. The new model, in contrast, has had positive feedback and has provided more support for students.

Hutchison did not have an additional Title I funded Instructional Coach in previous school years, nor had it developed the current model.

 

WHAT?

Summarize your SMARTR Outcomes data. What collective strengths can we celebrate? In what areas do we have the greatest opportunity for growth?

WHY?

Why were we successful in these areas? Did we implement our strategies well and is there a link between our strategies and goals? Why did we struggle in these areas? What did we not address as well as we could have?

SO WHAT?

For the next interim, what are our commitments to action to build on these strengths or to create the growth we desire?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRENGTHS OPPORTUN-ITIES FOR GROWTH

Initial Reflection

Although we didn’t meet the overall SIIP reading goal, 4th grade in gap group 3 made significant growth and progress.

 

We restructured mid-year to evaluate where our students were at and where they need to go.

 

Talking/Planning out focus lessons together and gathering resources.

 

Some units worked better than others (Book club, poetry)

 

We tried to work on writing with students but often robbed writing to do reading.

We had consistent GR groups daily. Many students were “double dipped”.

 

We had a strong RI process that addressed students timely and allocated resources.

 

Very thoughtful and purposeful planning of lessons and pacing.

 

Strong CLTs to map out the learning.

 

It was our first year together doing the New ELA PPG.

Thinking about the “must haves” list – how can we build on that list to create success for our students moving forward throughout the year and a successful R&W workshop? And hold ourselves accountable to them.

 

Writing – finding time to implement writing lessons. Consider short time writing groups (few weeks), “guided writing”.

 

Look at a common structure for a unit – switch out the reading content/genre.

 

Create the CLTs into working on the focus lessons and guided reading group planning

– creating materials, developing questions, etc.

 

NF Unit – rethink the pacing and time of to launch the unit. Not in alignment with the PPG. Consider adding more time to the unit.

Introduce book club with Character unit. Will allow us to bring book club back throughout the year as well.

 

Create a 5th grade (H/M/L) reading “new/current” book list for students w/enough in the book room.

 

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT GOAL—ACADEMICS

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT GOAL: All students will be literate, able to obtain, understand, analyze, integrate, communicate and apply knowledge and skills to achieve success in school and in life. Academic progress in the core disciplines will be measured to ensure that all students, regardless of race, poverty, language or disability, will graduate with the knowledge and skills necessary for college and/or employment, effectively eliminating achievement gaps.

 

Check all sub-goal(s) that apply to this school improvement plan objective.

X     1.1.     Achieve their full academic potential in the core disciplines of:

X     1.1.1. English language arts.

X     1.1.2. Mathematics.

X     1.1.3. Science.

__    1.1.4. Social studies.

__    1.2.     Communicate in at least two languages.

__    1.3.     Explore, understand, and value the fine and practical arts.

__    1.4.     Understand the interrelationship and interdependence of the countries and cultures of the world.

Academic Area(s):Reading         LEVEL: SCHOOL

X  CLOSE THE GAP       X  RAISE THE BAR         ☐ INDIVIDUAL GROWTH

Baseline/Initial Goal

Interim Goal

Interim Goal - As Needed

End of Year SMARTR Outcome

2017-2018 Reading SOL pass rate: 78%

 

2017-2018 Pass Rate for SWD: 73%

 

2017-2018 DRA pass rates: K- 56%

1st- 42%

2nd- 34%

 

 

Students at Hutchison Elementary school will reduce the failure rate by 10% on the Reading SOL in order to increase the pass rate from 78% to 80%.

Students with disabilities will reduce the failure rate by 10% on the Reading SOL in order to increase the pass rate from 73% to 75%.

Students entering grades k-2 below reading benchmark as measured by the DRA assessment will make at least 1 and a half years growth, as measured by the FCPS DRA yearly growth standards.

Students entering grade K-2 on or above reading benchmark as measure by the DRA assessment will make at least 1 year’s growth, as measured by the FCPS DRA yearly growth standards

Strategy 1: 

Apply workshop model to tier 1 instruction in order to meet the needs of all students

Action(s)

1.       Utilize FCPS workshop structure in K-6 (focus lesson, guided reading, independent reading, group tasks, reflection and sharing).

2.       Development around and implementation of a purposeful template(s) for guided reading.

3.       Implement/Use timeline for literacy instruction and professional development/support (through CLTs, LC and grade level support).

4.       Use quarterly data dialogues to monitor student progress and instructional practices to meet student needs.

*Primary: Universal screener, DRA/WA, DSA, running records and formative and common assessments, etc.

*Upper: Universal screener, DRA, formative and common assessments, eCart, DSA, etc.

5.       Participate in Literacy Collaborative year two for grades K-3 and year one for grades 4-6, with additional supports for 1st and 2nd graders learning about print.

6.       Continue to develop lesson plans and teacher strategies for rich student talk, utilizing resources from WIDA can-do descriptors, Academic Conversations, Total Participation Techniques, EL data portfolio, among other resources..

7.       Utilize MTSS protocols and processes to monitor student engagement during Tier 1 instruction in order to meet the needs of all students and provide necessary social/emotional support.

Strategy 2:

Collaboration between teachers and coaches to impact teacher practice and support student growth

Action(s)

  1. Continue to develop, support, and monitor the impact of content coaches through a year long in-house training/PD.
  2. Coach teachers: partner with teachers to establish teacher learning goals and cultivate teacher practices for well rounded tier 1 instruction.
  3. Continue to support teachers and team learning through the CLT cycle.
  4. Increase the frequency of data dialogues to include common assessments, in addition to division and diagnostic assessments

Strategy 3: 

Engage in and provide professional development to ensure student growth

Action:

  1. Deepen understanding of RC/PBIS strategies and align use to support student learning.
  2. Continue weekly MTSS meetings (formerly known as RI) to further improve implementation and behavior/social emotional supports.
  3. Develop ESOL team collaboration practices and implement a shared vision, mission, and goals for ESOL instruction with all staff.
  4. Implement strategies learned through FCPS provided training.
  5. Continue to develop teacher skillsets to increase student engagement and focused conversations in classrooms through implementation of strategies and structures from Academic Conversations, Total Participation Techniques, Number Talks, and Joyful Classroom, among other professional texts.
  6. Utilize quarterly planning days to impact teacher practice and support student growth.

Academic Area(s): Math       Level: School

X  CLOSE THE GAP      X  RAISE THE BAR       ☐ INDIVIDUAL GROWTH

 

Baseline/Initial Outcome

Interim Goal(s)

Interim Goal(s)- As Needed

End of Year SMARTR Outcome

2017-2018 Mathematics SOL overall pass rate: 85%

 

2017-2018 Structuring Numbers Percent of Students on benchmark:

K-70% 1st-27%

2nd-40%

 

 

Students at Hutchison Elementary school will reduce the failure rate by 10% on the Mathematics SOL in order to increase the pass rate from 85% to 87%.

 

Students in grades K-2 will show a decrease of 20% in the number of students below grade level in the area of structuring numbers, as measured by the AVMR assessment.

K- 76%

1st- 42%

2nd- 52%

Strategy 1

Apply workshop model to tier 1 instruction in order to meet the needs of all students.

Action(s)

  1. Utilize FCPS math workshop models in k-6.
  2. Development around and implementation of a purposeful template(s) for differentiated small group instruction.
  3. Apply timeline for math instruction and professional development/support.
  4. Use data to guide instruction within math workshop-universal screener, AVMR, formative and common assessments, eCart, etc.
  5. Provide enhanced access to accelerated math curriculum.
  6. Continue to develop lesson plans and teacher strategies for rich student talk, utilizing resources from Number Talks, WIDA can-do descriptors, Academic Conversations, Total Participation Techniques, EL data portfolio, among other resources.

Strategy 2

Collaboration between teachers and coaches to impact teacher practice and support student growth.

Action(s)

  1. Continue to develop, support, and monitor the impact of content coaches through a year long in-house training/PD.
  2. Coach teachers: partner with teachers to establish teacher learning goals and cultivate teacher practices for well rounded tier 1 instruction.
  3. Continue to support teachers and team learning through the CLT cycle.
  4. Increase the frequency of data dialogues to include common assessments, in addition to division and diagnostic assessments.

Strategy 3

Engage in and provide professional development to ensure student growth

Action(s)

  1. Deepen understanding of RC/PBIS strategies and align use to support student learning
  2. Continue weekly MTSS meetings (formerly known as RI) to further improve implementation and behavior/social emotional supports.
  3. Develop ESOL team collaboration practices and implement a shared vision, mission, and goals for ESOL instruction with all staff.
  4. Implement strategies learned through county provided training.
  5. Continue to develop teacher skillsets to increase student engagement and focused conversations in classrooms through implementation of strategies and structures from Academic Conversations, Total Participation Techniques, Number Talks, and Joyful Classroom, among other professional texts.
  6. Utilize quarterly planning days to impact teacher practice and support student growth.

Academic Area(s):Science         Level: School

X  CLOSE THE GAP        X  RAISE THE BAR       ☐ INDIVIDUAL GROWTH

Baseline/Initial Outcome

Interim Goal(s)

Interim Goal(s)- As Needed

End of Year SMARTR Outcome

2017-2018 Science SOL pass rate: 78%

 

 

 

Students at Hutchison Elementary school will reduce the failure rate by 10% on the Science SOL in order to increase the pass rate from 78% to 80%.

 

Strategy 1

Apply quality tier 1 instruction in order to meet the needs of all students. 

Action(s)

1.       Utilize Grade 5 science planning and pacing guide to ensure consistent and common instruction of science.

2.       Weekly science CLT meetings to develop and refine common lesson plans, differentiation of instruction and common assessments.

3.       Use quarterly data dialogues to monitor student progress and instructional practices to meet student needs.

4.       Continue to develop lesson plans and teacher strategies for rich student talk, utilizing resources from WIDA can-do descriptors, Academic Conversations, Total Participation Techniques, EL data portfolio, among other resources..

5.       Utilize MTSS protocols and processes to monitor student engagement during Tier 1 instruction in order to meet the needs of all students and provide necessary social/emotional support.

Strategy 2

Collaboration between teachers and coaches to impact teacher practice and support student growth. 

Action(s)

  1. Continue to develop, support, and monitor the impact of content coaches through a year long in-house training/PD.
  2. Coach teachers: partner with teachers to establish teacher learning goals and cultivate teacher practices for well rounded tier 1 instruction.
  3. Continue to support teachers and team learning through the CLT cycle.
  4. Increase the frequency of data dialogues to include common assessments, in addition to division and diagnostic assessments.

Strategy 3

Engage in and provide professional development to ensure student growth

Action(s)

  1. Deepen understanding of RC/PBIS strategies and align use to support student learning.
  2. Continue weekly MTSS meetings (formerly known as RI) to further improve implementation and behavior/social emotional supports.
  3. Develop ESOL team collaboration practices and implement a shared vision, mission, and goals for ESOL instruction with all staff.
  4. Implement strategies learned through county provided training.
  5. Continue to develop teacher skillsets to increase student engagement and focused conversations in classrooms through implementation of strategies and structures from Academic Conversations, Total Participation Techniques, Number Talks, and Joyful Classroom, among other professional texts.
  6. Utilize quarterly planning days to impact teacher practice and support student growth.